Journal of Sports Science and Nutrition

P-ISSN: 2707-7012, E-ISSN: 2707-7020
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Journal of Sports Science and Nutrition

2021, Vol. 2, Issue 1, Part B

Effect of foam rolling on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) with pain scores and power performance in varsity rugby players


Author(s): Muhamad Sadeeq Mustafa, Eliza Hafiz, Lim Boon Hooi, Sri Sumartiningsih and Rajesh Kumar

Abstract: Foam rolling (RF) has been recently proposed as a recovery strategy to reduce Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). It consists of a mechanical technique that mimics manual massage by using a dense FR to apply pressure on soft tissues. Previous findings observed a Pain Pressure Threshold (PPT) increase in both contralateral and ipsilateral limbs after rolling the ipsilateral plantar flexors, a tendency for a reduction in perceived soreness 10 minutes after a FR intervention. These studies suggest that the central nervous system may mediate recovery (e.g., perceived pain) processes. The main objective of current study was to determine whether the foam rolling had any effect on DOMS and pain scale. Twenty male rugby players (age: 20.7 ± 1.5 years) from University Malaya Rugby team who had no history of quadriceps injuries in the past 6 months were recruited for this study. Written informed consent was obtained from all the participants, repeated-measures design was used to examine the effects of foam rolling on the quadriceps: (1) numerical rating scale of the quadriceps pain score, (2) power (vertical jump height). All participants were divided into two groups that will undergo DOMS protocol (10 sets x 10 repetition of barbell back squats with 60% of 1RM) and a control group. Variables were measured at baseline, 24h post-DOMS protocol, 48h, and 72h. FR intervention was applied right after testing session, 24, 48 and 72 hours post-testing, consisting of rolling the quadriceps, adductors, hamstrings, iliotibial band, and gluteal muscles for 1 set of 45 seconds with 15 seconds rest for each muscle, repeating the protocol one time. Results of this study found that FR resulted in reduced pain score and increased power at various time points after exercise compared with the control condition. This results provide strong evidence that foam rolling can reduce DOMS and the associated in power output. Current findings shown that FR can improve physical performance, and alter the pain perception. This results supported previous studies that FR prophylactic effect after DOMS is due to a blood flow increase in the damaged tissue, and thus enhancing blood lactate removal, reducing tissue edema, and promoting higher and faster oxygen delivery to the muscle.

Pages: 84-88 | Views: 86 | Downloads: 69

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How to cite this article:
Muhamad Sadeeq Mustafa, Eliza Hafiz, Lim Boon Hooi, Sri Sumartiningsih, Rajesh Kumar. Effect of foam rolling on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) with pain scores and power performance in varsity rugby players. J Sports Sci Nutr 2021;2(1):84-88.
Journal of Sports Science and Nutrition